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 \ Current Issue \

  Titles (Click on a title to view the abstract)

  A Longitudinal Assessment of the Maslow’s Theory: A Dynamic Perspective
  Robin Widgery and Madhukar Angur

  Distinguishing the Liability of Foreignness from Liability of Globalization
  Ravi Parameswaran and Deepak Sethi

  Evolution of the Capacity Assessment Tools
  R. Krishnaveni and B. Sripirabaa

  Predictors of Successful Transfer of Management Training
  Clement Opare, Brian D’Netto, and Juan España

  The Other Side of Paradise: Coping with the Downsides of Globalization for Developing Countries
  Rajaram Veliyath, Kamal Fatehi, and James Herbert

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  Abstracts

  A Longitudinal Assessment of the Maslow’s Theory: A Dynamic Perspective
  Robin Widgery and Madhukar Angur

  A longitudinal study over a two-year period was conducted in a large manufacturing plant. The researcher was provided an
  opportunity to test changes in motivation before and after a period of merit pay deprivation. In doing so, aspects of Maslow’s
  Theory were tested using a dynamic research model. It was hypothesized that as lower needs were satisfied, these needs would
  correlate less with motivation. Moreover, it was predicted that the correlations of need level satisfaction with perceived
  motivation, when examined across time, would increase in an ascending (hierarchical) order, the lowest coefficient would be for
  the physiological need and the highest for self-actualization. Although the dynamic model produced the hierarchical ordering of
  the correlates, the concept of prepotency was not supported. As one level of need was satisfied, the next level in the hierarchy
  increased in correlation with motivation, but so did all other higher needs.
      

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  Distinguishing the Liability of Foreignness from Liability of Globalization
  Ravi Parameswaran and Deepak Sethi

  The International Business Environment (IBE) is the most significant element that differentiates multinational enterprises
  (MNEs) from purely domestic firms, which the former routinely negotiate during cross-border operations. The complexity,
  volatility, and interdependence of the IBE have increased exponentially in the last two decades due to phenomenal increases in
  global trade and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), global supply chains and complex multi-country networks. MNEs now adopt a
  global perspective rather than the narrow, dyadic home-country focus engendered in the traditional Liability of Foreignness (LOF)
  notion, and incur substantial costs in developing IBE-reading and dynamic adaptation capabilities. This study therefore proposes
  the concept of the Liability of Globalization (LOG), quite distinct from the traditional LOF, thus facilitating theory to catch up with
  practice. Drawing on the resource-based perspective it argues that MNE capabilities at keeping their strategy/structure/routines
  in sync with the ever-changing IBE impact competitive advantage. Using the grounded theory approach the study carries out an
  inductive analysis of interviews of several MNE executives, and juxtaposing them with the stock of extant research, develops
  propositions that open new avenues for further research.

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  Evolution of the Capacity Assessment Tools
  R. Krishnaveni and B. Sripirabaa

  Organizations assess their performance periodically to ensure achievement of strategic goals. A plethora of methodologies are
  available for assessing organizational performance. Capacity building is one such methodology extensively used by non-profit
  organizations, non-government organizations, community development agencies, civil society organizations, and funding
  agencies to assess the efficacy of the programs organized or funded by them. This paper gives an insight into the evolution of such
  tools that have been developed and applied for capacity assessment in the last decade. The study identified ten tools and grouped
  them into three phases. The focus of the tools in each phase ranged from assessment of the organization capacity, to assessing the
  strengths and weakness of organizations in focused areas and to the assessment of the benefits of specific programs. The paper ends
  with a comparison of the focal areas of these tools.

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  Predictors of Successful Transfer of Management Training
  Clement Opare, Brian D’Netto, and Juan España

  A large number of organizations incur considerable expenditure on management training. However, these training costs can be
  justified only if the knowledge and skills acquired in the training program is transferred back to the workplace. This study
  examines the factors that are associated with the transfer of management training. The current analysis was based on a survey
  involving a sample of participants from 200 organizations selected at random from among Australia’s top 500 companies. Data
  were collected using a structured questionnaire from managers who had attended training programs within the past two years.
  Multiple regression results indicate that motivation to attend the training, trainee perceptions and supervisor support are
  significantly associated with transfer of training. The implications of these findings are discussed.

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  The Other Side of Paradise: Coping with the Downsides of Globalization for Developing Countries
  Rajaram Veliyath, Kamal Fatehi, and James Herbert

  Those in the business disciplines usually propose the superiority of unfettered market forces as an economic rationale in favor of
  globalization. This paper argues that business interests need to hear what critics have to say about the negative effects of
  globalization on developing nations and the need to balance economic as well as cultural, developmental, social and other
  considerations. Further, the importance of these non-economic effects of globalization requires the regulation of pure capitalism
  through different perspectives and approaches, some of which are proposed in this paper. These include consciously acknowledging
  the downsides, modifying our thinking about globalization, designing alternative models of development, creating frameworks for
  collaboration among agencies in critical areas, and establishing appropriate multilateral institutions with enforcement powers.

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© 2009 Alliance Business Academy